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THERE ARE NO EXCUSES FOR TELLING PEOPLE TO KILL THEMSELVES. NONE. ESPECIALLY OVER THE INTERNET, WHERE YOU HAVE TIME TO THINK OF WHAT YOU’RE SAYING WHILE YOU’RE TYPING IT.

binarycanine:

LIST OF COMMON INVALID EXCUSES:

  • "I was having a panic attack and lashed out!"
  • "I wasn’t thinking!"
  • "They triggered me!"
  • "They’re a bad person!"

EXPLANATION ≠ EXCUSE

EXPLAINING WHY YOU TOLD SOMEONE TO KILL THEMSELVES IS NOT AN EXCUSE. OWN UP TO YOUR MISTAKE AND APOLOGIZE.

SUICIDE AND DEATH ARE SERIOUS THINGS THAT REALLY, ACTUALLY HAPPEN. STOP ENCOURAGING IT BECAUSE YOU’RE UPSET.

libutron:

Black Slime Mold

This photo shows the fruiting bodies (sporangia) of the cosmopolitan slim mold species Comatricha nigra growing on dead wood. The fragile sporangia of this species is less than 1 cm tall.

[Protista - Amoebozoa - Myxogastrea - Stemonitales - Stemonitidaceae - Comatricha Preuss 1851 - Comatricha nigra (Pers.) J. Schröt. 1885]

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Juraj Komar | Locality: Piešt̕any, Trnavsky, Slovakia

centralparknyc:

A new report (detailed here) from Columbia University details how climate change may effect Central Park. The report says rising temperatures will be hard on our trees—especially the young and old—and on the organisms (both animal and vegetal) that live in our man made bodies of water, and it may make caring for our famous lawns ever more challenging.
But, there is an upside. Central Park is actually a useful tool in mitigating the effects of climate change. As long as we, the Central Park Conservancy, continue to support the Park’s biodiversity and keep our ecosystem healthy (a task we are deeply committed to), then the Park will continue to “increase its resilience to climate change, and make it a suitable habitat for more plants and animals.”
(via Studying climate change in Central Park | New York)
Zoom Info
Camera
iPhone 4S
ISO
400
Aperture
f/2.4
Exposure
1/15th
Focal Length
4mm

centralparknyc:

A new report (detailed here) from Columbia University details how climate change may effect Central Park. The report says rising temperatures will be hard on our trees—especially the young and old—and on the organisms (both animal and vegetal) that live in our man made bodies of water, and it may make caring for our famous lawns ever more challenging.

But, there is an upside. Central Park is actually a useful tool in mitigating the effects of climate change. As long as we, the Central Park Conservancy, continue to support the Park’s biodiversity and keep our ecosystem healthy (a task we are deeply committed to), then the Park will continue to “increase its resilience to climate change, and make it a suitable habitat for more plants and animals.”

(via Studying climate change in Central Park | New York)

mucholderthen:

AMAZING DOPPLER RADAR IMAGE:
FROM OUT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, MAYFLIES EMERGE TO MATE AND DIE

Via evolutionary biologist Jerry Coyne's Why Evolution Is True blog [July 22, 2014]

  • What you’re seeing is a Doppler radar loop from the Lacrosse, Wisconsin office of the National Weather Service.  
  • What the radar saw for 90 minutes was a massive mayfly emergence on June 23.
  • Probably the giant mayfly, Hexagenia limbata.

On Saturday evening, June 23 2012, a massive mayfly emergence occurred along the Mississippi River beginning just after 9 pm. By late evening, mayflies were swarming in La Crosse, La Crescent, and points up and down the river. While the emergence of mayflies from their river bottom mud dwelling can occur at various times through the warm season, this particular event was one of the best seen on radar yet.

In the radar time lapse loop from 9 pm to just after 1030 pm, the yellows and oranges indicate a large magnitude of airborne mayflies.

Go here to see another amazing radar loop showing part of this swarm of mayflies being carried off by the wind at altitudes as high as 3000 feet!

More information [as well as images] at the La Crosse National Weather Service site …

mucholderthen:

Mutated, drug-resistant bacteria lurk in the peaceful British countryside
Sewage-treatment plants described as giant ‘mixing vessels’
after scientists discover mutated microbes in British river

Exclusive to The Independent, 19 July 2014 (by Steve Connor)

Superbugs resistant to some of the most powerful antibiotics in the medical arsenal have been found for the first time in a British river – with scientists pinpointing a local sewage-treatment plant as the most likely source.

Scientists discovered the drug-resistant bacteria in sediment samples taken downstream of the sewerage plant on the River Sowe near Coventry. The microbes contained mutated genes that confer resistance to the latest generation of antibiotics.

The researchers believe the discovery shows how antibiotic resistance has become widespread in the environment, with sewage-treatment plants now acting as giant “mixing vessels” where antibiotic resistance can spread between different microbes.

A study found that a wide range of microbes living in the river had acquired a genetic mutation that is known to provide resistance to third-generation cephalosporins, a class of antibiotics used widely to treat meningitis, blood infections and other hospital-acquired infections.

Read more …

Copyright by The Independent, all rights reserved.

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